Alice Miller, child abuse and mistreatment

APRIL 2010

MARCH 2010

FEBRUARY 2010

JANUARY 2010

DECEMBER 2009

NOVEMBER 2009

OCTOBER 2009

SEPTEMBER 2009

AUGUST 2009

JULY 2009

JUNE 2009

MAY 2009

APRIL 2009

MARCH 2009

FEBRUARY 2009

JANUARY 2009

DECEMBER 2008

NOVEMBER 2008

OCTOBER 2008

SEPTEMBER 2008

AUGUST 2008

JULY 2008

JUNE 2008

MAY 2008

APRIL 2008

MARCH 2008

FEBRUARY 2008

JANUARY 2008

DECEMBER 2007

NOVEMBER 2007

OCTOBER 2007

SEPTEMBER 2007

AUGUST 2007

JULY 2007

JUNE 2007

MAY 2007

APRIL 2007

MARCH 2007

FEBRUARY 2007

JANUARY 2007

DECEMBER 2006

NOVEMBER 2006

OCTOBER 2006

SEPTEMBER 2006

AUGUST 2006

JULY 2006

JUNE 2006

MAY 2006

APRIL 2006

MARCH 2006

FEBRUARY 2006

JANUARY 2006

DECEMBER 2005

NOVEMBER 2005

OCTOBER 2005

SEPTEMBER 2005

AUGUST 2005

JULY 2005

How to protect children from a teacher?
Tuesday November 03, 2009






--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dear Dr. Miller;

I have been working as an early childhood educator for many years -- in both the US and Canada -- and your books have been the cornerstone of my philosophy. I have been always dedicated to working with children in a compassionate, empathic, respectful way and it has served the children in my care -- as well as my intrinsic self -- very well.

Still I am amazed at the way many educated people -- teachers, administrators, parents -- still manage to cling to pedagogic, authoritarian, "let's show them who is boss" ways of working with children. As if they were trying to break the child as one would break a horse.

Now, at the age of 51, I am a parent (for the first time) of a four-year-old. I continue to parent my son along the same philosophies outlined in your writings. But as he approaches his school years I am frightened for my son concerning what sort of educators he may encounter during his school years. How is it best to continue to protect my son, yet also allow him the independence he needs to grow and flourish as a human being?

Thank you so much.

Sincerely, JK

AM: You can hope that the good time he enjoyed with you in the first years of his life when he was respected and loved by you will help him to recognize cruelty and injustice if he meets them in school and to look for your support. Mistreated children are too much afraid of doing that.

Top