Alice Miller, child abuse and mistreatment

APRIL 2010

MARCH 2010

FEBRUARY 2010

JANUARY 2010

DECEMBER 2009

NOVEMBER 2009

OCTOBER 2009

SEPTEMBER 2009

AUGUST 2009

JULY 2009

JUNE 2009

MAY 2009

APRIL 2009

MARCH 2009

FEBRUARY 2009

JANUARY 2009

DECEMBER 2008

NOVEMBER 2008

OCTOBER 2008

SEPTEMBER 2008

AUGUST 2008

JULY 2008

JUNE 2008

MAY 2008

APRIL 2008

MARCH 2008

FEBRUARY 2008

JANUARY 2008

DECEMBER 2007

NOVEMBER 2007

OCTOBER 2007

SEPTEMBER 2007

AUGUST 2007

JULY 2007

JUNE 2007

MAY 2007

APRIL 2007

MARCH 2007

FEBRUARY 2007

JANUARY 2007

DECEMBER 2006

NOVEMBER 2006

OCTOBER 2006

SEPTEMBER 2006

AUGUST 2006

JULY 2006

JUNE 2006

MAY 2006

APRIL 2006

MARCH 2006

FEBRUARY 2006

JANUARY 2006

DECEMBER 2005

NOVEMBER 2005

OCTOBER 2005

SEPTEMBER 2005

AUGUST 2005

JULY 2005

Abuse of an entire generation?
Friday February 02, 2007

Dear Dr. Miller:
I am a long-time reader of your work, and just recently finished The Body Never Lies. This sparked a train of thought relating to the behavior of the American baby boom generation (of which I am a member) that I have never heard addressed.
I distinctly remember the Kent State killings of 1970. The Ohio State National Guard came to the campus of Kent State University, a moderate-sized Ohio school, to respond to anti-Vietnam War protests. The Guard eventually fired at random into a crowd of protesters, killing four students. At the time, my mother told me she thought that if I were ever involved in any protests against the social order I also would deserve to be shot and killed.
In retrospect it is difficult to believe the amount of raw hate social conservatives directed toward the rebellious youth of the day, in part because defenders of the status quo have systematically denigrated the fundamental seriousness of the rebellion ever since. But I do not think my mother’s response was at all unusual.
Largely as a result of this hostility, I withdrew from all political activism for many years after Kent State. Horrifying though it is to believe that a generation of parents would rather see their children dead than have their basic social assumptions challenged, I have come to believe that there is an element of truth to this. Perhaps this accounts for the inability of my generation to fully exert its enormous political power and fulfill the promise of our youth.
I would be interested to hear any thoughts you may have on this subject. Thank you for your work.
B.

AM: You write: “Horrifying though it is to believe that a generation of parents would rather see their children dead than have their basic social assumptions challenged, I have come to believe that there is an element of truth to this.” I am afraid that this important quote not only concerns one generation but many, many.

Top